Extraordinary’ Breakthroughs in Anti-Aging Research ‘Will Happen Faster Than People Think

“Science fiction has become science.” A UK-based anti-aging CEO of Juvenescence biotech has reportedly raised $165 million in just the past 18 months to fund his company’s longevity projects with the lofty goal of extending human lifespans up to 150 years, and believes the world is about to be “shocked” by what’s not just in the works, but what is already here.

Longevity Study Seeks Participants, But Only Dogs Need Apply

Researchers are undertaking what they say is the largest open study on aging ever on one beloved subject — dogs.

The citizen-science study, called the Dog Aging Project, is funded by a $15 million grant from the National Council on Aging. Scientists’ goal is to discover new aspects of human aging by studying dogs, which share many diseases and genetic markers with humans.

Moderation of Neural Excitation Promotes Longevity

An unexpected link between the nervous system and ageing has emerged. They show that overall neuronal excitation is a major determinant of lifespan, and that it is higher in short-lived individuals and lower in the long-lived. The authors also characterize some of the molecular players in this effect, and tie it to a well-known regulator of lifespan: signaling by the hormone insulin or by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1).

Daily Exposure to Blue Light May Accelerate Aging, Even If It Doesn’t Reach Your Eyes

Prolonged exposure to blue light, such as that which emanates from your phone, computer and household fixtures, could be affecting your longevity, even if it’s not shining in your eyes. New research suggests that the blue wavelengths produced by light-emitting diodes damage cells in the brain as well as retinas, according to a new study in a model organism.

New Gene Editing Technology Could Correct 89% of Genetic Defects

(CNN) Scientists have developed a new gene-editing technology that could potentially correct up to 89% of genetic defects, including those that cause diseases like sickle cell anemia.

The new technique is called “prime editing,” and was developed by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, who published their findings Monday in the journal Nature.

Owning a Dog May Add Years to Your Life, Study Shows

In a 2019 study entitled Dog Ownership and Survival, A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, dog ownership has been linked with decreased cardiovascular risk. Recent reports have suggested an association of dog companionship with lower blood pressure levels, improved lipid profile, and diminished sympathetic responses to stress. However, it is unclear if dog ownership is associated with improved survival as previous studies have yielded inconsistent results. Thus, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the association of dog ownership with all-cause mortality, with and without prior cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular mortality.